Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Property Economy | Services



Superhosting Listings.....
There is perhaps no greater example of how lucrative the sharing economy can be than Airbnb. In the years since its launch the website that lets anyone rent out their property has propelled its founders—Brian Chesky, Nathan Blecharczyk, and Joe Gebbia—onto Forbes billionaires list with estimated fortunes of a couple of billion each. That’s to say nothing of the company’s rumored valuation in the billions, partly due to the fact that Airbnb now has over one million listings in 190 countries. But Airbnb isn’t just aiming to make its shareholders rich; it’s also making plenty of money for its hosts too—especially the ones at the top of the hospitality supply chain whom the company refers to as “Superhosts". These superhosts have a response rate of at least 90%, have hosted at least 10 trips, do not cancel, and have at least 80% five-star ratings. In 2009, the company first launched the program to recognize the early superhosts who helped set a high standard for hosting on Airbnb. The Airbnb community has grown considerably since then, but it’s just as important now as it was in 2009 and the company continues to showcase the top-performing hosts in its community. Commercial property owners are also striving for this status becuase it looks good and increases bookings—so since introducing it the bar is constantly being raised when it comes to using the site and hosting guests. The site has reportedly welcomed over 40,000 Superhosts since the program began in 2009. For some of these Superhosts, Airbnb rentals can mean revenue in the five or six figures. While much of Airbnb’s business is based on “regular” residential property owners who are offering extra rooms or beds, these highly profitable outliers—often hosts with multiple listings or whole homes for rent—have become the subject of controversy. An analysis of global Airbnb listsings showed that hosts offering multiple listings made up over 40% of the company’s business. At one point in 2013, a study illustrated that nearly 30% of Airbnb’s offerings in major cities were from hosts with multiple listings. Commercial property owners are now considering the services of property consultants because they have invested in the luxury multiple residences or even whole apartment to rent which requires an Airbnb management service at their disposal to increase their listing status.



Borehole Investment.....
Low rainfall and drought conditions have left South Africa with eight out of the nine provinces declared disaster areas earlier this year. In addition, the cost of water in South Africa has continued to increase over time, primarily due to inflation and shortages in water supply. The problem has further been aggravated by the recent low rainfall in South Africa. Johannesburg Water has for instance entered into a partnership with the Borehole Water Association to encourage residents to use borehole water to mitigate the ongoing drought and to relieve the pressure on surface water demand. Groundwater resources have always played a critical role in meeting the water demands of traditionally water-scarce areas of the world, but what about the cost of having a borehole drilled and equipped? According to a 2005 case study, South African households with piped water and with stand sizes larger than 500sqm, often use up to 46% of their water consumption on irrigating the garden. Using municipal water for the purposes of garden irrigation is quite frankly a waste of potable water. By using groundwater for irrigation, property owners can potentially save money on their water bills, while decreasing the demand on the municipal water supply. Municipalities use tariff rates that increase in proportion to usage. This has a significant impact on the water bill at the end of the month. Given the cost of installing and maintaining a borehole, is the potential saving in water really worth it? To answer that question, we have to look at the costs involved in installing and maintaining a borehole in an office block with a garden and then in a typical residential property. Briefly, groundwater use is governed by the National Water Act, 1998 (Act No. 36 of 1998) (NWA) and permitted for private use in terms of Schedule 1. Where water is used for domestic purposes only and less than 10m³ per day is used, no registration is required. But where more than 10m³ per day is being abstracted on a property, a registration with the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is required.

Consultative Approach.....
I operate a property consulting agency that maximizes both the relationship and technical management of my client's projects by applying a unique approach. My agency jointly explores the best options to prevent or reduce loss by offering a single point of contact for clients with a team of consultants who handle all questions and concerns as well as overseeing the property survey and inspection schedules. Documan Consulting also works as liaison between the client, architect, engineer, contractor, fabricator, vendor and local authority including performing a comprehensive field survey to help identify exposures that could affect a clients' property performance as well as in the event of unexpected losses or service interuptions. I developed a state-of-the-art project assessment methodology which ensures consistency for each property performance and I also deploy a team of professionals who are matched through industrial or technical experience with the projects and property under evaluation. While my agency utilize the National Building Regulations and Standards as default, my consulting team is also familiar with other internationally recognized standards. As a property consultant, I do not believe in summary reporting unless that is what our client specifically requires. Consequently, I believe in providing a fully comprehensive report because I work with a team of property consultants who have different trades and are skilled in the testing and commissioning of systems. My agency provides best practice recommendations for the improvement of any building's performance and I work with clients to ensure that planned projects are tracked and completed in the most cost-effective ways. I have also offered detailed building service interruption studies as well as technical knowledge transfer to other consultants.